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Your Teeth and Allergies

Allergy season is upon us! Have your teeth started hurting all of a sudden? It might not actually be your teeth. The pain you are feeling can be caused by your allergies! The sinuses that sit on your upper jaw, when congested, can put pressure on the surrounding areas causing pain in your upper teeth, cheeks, and right below the eyes. Not only do those allergens make your eyes and nose run, they can indirectly create tooth pain. When the sinuses become congested, inflamed or infected they can swell up. The swelling of the sinuses can press up against the roof of your mouth and cause pain and discomfort in nerves of the teeth. It can cause sensitivity to cold, pain when biting or chewing and or a throbbing sensation. If you are not sure if the pain is actually coming from your teeth or if it is because of your allergies, consult with your dentist to rule out any actual tooth problems like decay or abscess. Dina Lopez...

Dental Care and Nutrition

Prevention is the key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. But it takes more than exercise and regular trips to your doctor and dentist to do the trick. A well-balanced diet is often the key to keeping healthy, especially when it comes to oral health. Your diet should generally include a variety of foods from the 5 major food groups: Milk, yogurt and cheese Vegetables Meat, poultry, fish, eggs and nuts Fruit Bread, cereal, rice and pasta These help the body to get the nutrients it needs. If your diet is low in certain nutrients, it may be more difficult for your mouth to resist infection. This could eventually lead to periodontal disease, which is a major cause of tooth loss in adults. Periodontal disease is caused by bacteria in dental plaque. Plaque is the sticky substance that forms on your teeth soon after you have brushed. In an effort to get rid of the bacteria, the cells of your immune system release substances that inflame and damage the gums, periodontal ligament or alveolar bone. It’s not only what you eat that can cause tooth decay, it’s how often and when you eat it. Foods eaten as part of a meal, are often less risky to your teeth than snacks. The reason is you produce additional saliva during meals, which helps to neutralize acid production caused by bacteria in plaque and also clears from the mouth. As to where snacks stay in your mouth for long periods of time, especially hard or sticky candy. Acids can attack teeth during this time. Avoid snacking before going to bed, the foods stay...

Water: The best drink for your oral health

There are many benefits from drinking water other than improving your physical health. Water just may be the best beverage for your teeth. Just like saliva, water helps wash away sugars and acids from your teeth. It also contains fluoride, a mineral that protects against tooth erosion and is found in toothpaste and some mouthwashes. Fluoride occurs naturally in water (including some bottled spring water) and can be found in most tap water in the United States. The benefits from having fluoride in your water is that it battles against dental cavities, it strengthens tooth enamel and remineralizes teeth damaged by acid. Thus promoting a stronger, healthier teeth and less cavities. Unfortunately, the majority of bottled water contains little to no fluoride. In fact, fluoride may even be removed from water during the filtration process. Bottling companies and home filtration systems remove sediments and impurities from the water as well. So if you prefer bottled or filtered water there is a simple solution, you can always buy fluoride drops or tablets that infuse your water with the right amount of fluoride. So just remember the next time you reach for that soft drink, your teeth would be much more grateful if you opted for some water. Prevents Staining Some foods and drinks are capable of staining your teeth. Foods like berries, candy, deep-colored sauces and drinks such as coffee can stain your teeth. If you allow these foods or drinks to remain in your teeth for long, they are capable of staining your teeth. Swishing water in your mouth several times will be helpful in flushing away the staining elements of these foods or...

Tooth erosion

Tooth erosion can be very painful and eventually be very harmful to your teeth. There are many factors that play into this. Here is some more information on the causes, effects , and how erosion can be treated. Tooth erosion happens when acids wear away the enamel on teeth. Enamel erosion can be caused by the following: Improper brushing ( using too much force/ using a medium or firm tooth brush Excessive soft drink consumption (high levels of phosphoric and citric acids) Fruit drinks (some acids in fruit drinks are more erosive than battery acid) Dry Mouth or low salivary flow (xerostomia) Diet (high in sugar and starches) Acid reflux disease Gastrointestinal problems Medicine (antihistamines, aspirin) Genetics Environmental factors (friction, wear and tear, stress, and corrosion) The signs of enamel erosion can vary, depending on the stage. Some signs may include: Sensitivity. Certain foods (sweets) and temperatures of foods (hot or cold) may cause a twinge of pain in the early stage of enamel erosion. Discoloration. As the enamel erodes and more dentin is exposed, the teeth may appear yellow. Cracks and chips. The edges of teeth become more rough, irregular, and jagged as enamel erodes. Severe, painful sensitivity. In later stages of enamel erosion, teeth become extremely sensitive to temperatures and sweets. You may feel a painful jolt. Cupping. Indentations appear on the surface of the teeth. When enamel erodes, the tooth is more susceptible to cavities or tooth decay. To prevent enamel loss and keep teeth healthy, be sure to brush, floss, and rinse with a fluoride and antiseptic mouthwash daily. See your dentist every six months...

Healthy Mouth, Healthy Body

The health of your gums and teeth can have a big affect on the overall health of your body. There are many health risks that are linked to poor oral hygiene. Adults that suffer from periodontal disease (swollen, bleeding gums) are at risk of developing cardiovascular problems such as heart disease, blockages of blood vessels and strokes. Poor oral hygiene has also been linked to the development of infection in other parts of the body. Research has linked gum disease to rheumatoid arthritis (causes inflammation of the joints). Also people that suffer from diabetes often have gum disease. A healthy mouth that’s free of gum disease and cavities leads to a healthy body. Your quality of life is bound to be better, there’s no need to worry about aching teeth or infections in your mouth to distract you. Remember to teach your children good oral hygiene habits, its never to early to start. Good habits to practice are brushing twice a day, floss at least once a day before bed and remember to see your dentist regularly for check- ups and cleanings. The choice for a better life is in your...

New Patient Specials

  New Patient Specials from Dental Care of Chino Hills To welcome new patients, we offer special promos and discounts to help them get back on track to great oral health.    Call us today at (909) 606-9907 to schedule an appointment and start having healthy smiles for a healthy...